ReactJS - Components


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In this tutorial we will show you how to combine components to make the app easier to maintain. This approach will allow you to update and change your components without affecting the rest of the page.

Stateless Example

Our first component in example below is App. This component is owner of Header and Content. We are creating Header and Content separately and just adding it inside JSX tree in our App component. Only App component needs to be exported.

App.jsx

import React from 'react';

class App extends React.Component {
   render() {
      return (
         <div>
            <Header/>
            <Content/>
         </div>
      );
   }
}

class Header extends React.Component {
   render() {
      return (
         <div>
            <h1>Header</h1>
         </div>
      );
   }
}

class Content extends React.Component {
   render() {
      return (
         <div>
            <h2>Content</h2>
            <p>The content text!!!</p>
         </div>
      );
   }
}

export default App;

To be able to render this on page, we need to import it in main.js file and call reactDOM.render(). We already did it when we were setting environment.

main.js

import React from 'react';
import ReactDOM from 'react-dom';
import App from './App.jsx';

ReactDOM.render(<App />, document.getElementById('app'));

Above code will generate following result:

React Component Stateless

Stateful Example

In this example we will set the state for owner component (App). The Header component is just added like in the last example since it doesn't need any state. Instead of content tag, we are creating table and tbody elements where we will dynamically insert TableRow for every object from the data array. You can see that we are using EcmaScript 2015 arrow syntax () which looks much cleaner then the old JavaScript syntax. This will help us create our elements with fewer lines of code. It is especially useful when you need to create list with a lot of items.

App.jsx

import React from 'react';

class App extends React.Component {
   constructor() {
      super();
		
      this.state = {
         data: 
         [
            {
               "id":1,
               "name":"Foo",
               "age":"20"
            },
				
            {
               "id":2,
               "name":"Bar",
               "age":"30"
            },
				
            {
               "id":3,
               "name":"Baz",
               "age":"40"
            }
         ]
      }
   }
	
   render() {
      return (
         <div>
            <Header/>
            <table>
               <tbody>
                  {this.state.data.map((person, i) => <TableRow key = {i} data = {person} />)}
               </tbody>
            </table>
         </div>
      );
   }
}

class Header extends React.Component {
   render() {
      return (
         <div>
            <h1>Header</h1>
         </div>
      );
   }
}

class TableRow extends React.Component {
   render() {
      return (
         <tr>
            <td>{this.props.data.id}</td>
            <td>{this.props.data.name}</td>
            <td>{this.props.data.age}</td>
         </tr>
      );
   }
}

export default App;

main.js

import React from 'react';
import ReactDOM from 'react-dom';
import App from './App.jsx';

ReactDOM.render(<App/>, document.getElementById('app'));

NOTE

Notice that we are using key = {i} inside map() function. This will help React to update only necessary elements instead of re-rendering entire list when something change. It is huge performance boost for larger number of dynamically created elements.

React Component Statefull

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