Python Operators Precedence Example


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The following table lists all operators from highest precedence to lowest.

OperatorDescription
** Exponentiation (raise to the power)
~ + - Ccomplement, unary plus and minus (method names for the last two are +@ and -@)
* / % // Multiply, divide, modulo and floor division
+ - Addition and subtraction
>> << Right and left bitwise shift
& Bitwise 'AND'td>
^ | Bitwise exclusive `OR' and regular `OR'
<= < > >= Comparison operators
<> == != Equality operators
= %= /= //= -= += *= **= Assignment operators
is is not Identity operators
in not in Membership operators
not or and Logical operators

Operator precedence affects how an expression is evaluated.

For example, x = 7 + 3 * 2; here, x is assigned 13, not 20 because operator * has higher precedence than +, so it first multiplies 3*2 and then adds into 7.

Here, operators with the highest precedence appear at the top of the table, those with the lowest appear at the bottom.

Example

#!/usr/bin/python

a = 20
b = 10
c = 15
d = 5
e = 0

e = (a + b) * c / d       #( 30 * 15 ) / 5
print "Value of (a + b) * c / d is ",  e

e = ((a + b) * c) / d     # (30 * 15 ) / 5
print "Value of ((a + b) * c) / d is ",  e

e = (a + b) * (c / d);    # (30) * (15/5)
print "Value of (a + b) * (c / d) is ",  e

e = a + (b * c) / d;      #  20 + (150/5)
print "Value of a + (b * c) / d is ",  e

When you execute the above program, it produces the following result −

Value of (a + b) * c / d is 90
Value of ((a + b) * c) / d is 90
Value of (a + b) * (c / d) is 90
Value of a + (b * c) / d is 50

python_basic_operators.htm

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