Basic Operators in Python

PythonServer Side ProgrammingProgramming

In this tutorial, we are going to learn about the basic operators in Python.

Arithmetic Operators

Arithmetic operators are useful in performing mathematical operations like addition, subtraction, multiplication, etc..,

  • Addition ----- Adds two numbers ----- +
  • Subtraction ----- Substracts one number from another ----- -
  • Multiplication ----- Multiplies two numbers ----- *
  • Division ----- Divides one number with another ----- /
  • Floor Division ------ It returns integer after division ----- //
  • Modulus ----- It gives remainder ----- %

Let's see the examples.

Example

# initialising two numbers
a = 5
b = 2
# addition
print(f'Addition: {a + b}')
# substraction
print(f'Substraction: {a - b}')
# multiplication
print(f'Multiplication: {a * b}')
# division
print(f'Division: {a / b}')
# floor division
print(f'Floor Division: {a // b}')
# modulus
print(f'Modulus: {a % b}')

Output

If you run the above program, you will get the following results.

Addition: 7
Substraction: 3
Multiplication: 10
Division: 2.5
Floor Division: 2
Modulus: 1

Relational Operators

Relational operators return either True or False as a result. These operators are used to compare the same type of objects in Python. Let's see a list of relational operators.

  • Greater than ----- > ----- Checks whether a number is greater than other or not
  • Greater than or equal to ----- >= ----- Checks whether a number is greater than or equal to other or not
  • Less than ----- < ----- Checks whether a number is less than other or not
  • Less than or equal to ----- <= ----- Checks whether a number is less than or equal to other or not
  • Equal to ----- == ----- Checks whether a number is similar to other or not
  • Not equal to ----- != ----- Checks whether a number is not similar to other or not

Let's see the examples.

Example

# initialising two numbers
a = 5
b = 2
# greater than
print(f'Greater than: {a > b}')
# greater than or equal to
print(f'Greater than or equal to: {a >= b}')
# less than
print(f'Less than: {a < b}')
# less than or equal to
print(f'Less than or qual to: {a <= b}')
# equal to
print(f'Equal to: {a == b}')
# not equal to
print(f'Not equal to: {a != b}')

Output

If you run the above code, you will get the following results.

Greater than: True
Greater than or equal to: True
Less than: False
Less than or qual to: False
Equal to: False
Not equal to: True

Logical Operators

Logical operators are used to performing logical operations like and, or, and not.

  • and ----- True if both are True
  • or ----- False if both are False
  • not ----- Inverts the operand

Let's see the examples.

Example

# initialising variables
a = True
b = False
# and
print(f'and: {a and b}')
# or
print(f'or: {a or b}')
# not
print(f'not: {not a}')
print(f'not: {not b}')

Output

If you run the above code, you will get the following results.

and: False
or: True
not: False
not: True

Bitwise Operators

Bitwise operators are used to performing bitwise operators like and, or, and not.

  • & ----- True if both are True
  • | ----- False if both are False
  • ~ ----- Inverts the operand

Let's see the examples.

Example

# initialising numbers
a = 5
b = 2
# bitwise and
print(f'Bitwise and: {a & b}')
# bitwise or
print(f'Bitwise or: {a | b}')
# bitwise not
print(f'Bitwise not: {~a}')
# bitwise not
print(f'Bitwise not: {~b}')

Output

If you run the above program, you will get the following results.

Bitwise and: 0
Bitwise or: 7
Bitwise not: -6
Bitwise not: -3

Assignment Operators

Assignment operators are used to assigning values to the variables. We have the following assignment operators.

  • = ----- assign a number to a variable
  • += ----- adds a number and assigns to the variable
  • -= ----- subtracts a number and assigns to the variable
  • *= ----- multiplies a number and assigns to the variable
  • /= ----- divides a number and assigns to the variable
  • //= ----- divides(floor division) a number and assigns to the variable
  • %= ----- modulus a number and assigns to the variable\

Let's see the examples.

Example

# =
a = 5
print(f'=:- {a}')
# +=
a += 1 # a = a + 1
print(f'+=:- {a}')
# -=
a -= 1 # a = a - 1
print(f'-=:- {a}')
# *=
a *= 2 # a = a * 1
print(f'*=:- {a}')
# /=
a /= 2 # a = a / 1
print(f'/=:- {a}')
# //=
a //= 2 # a = a // 1
print(f'//=:- {a}')
# %=
a %= 10 # a = a % 1
print(f'%=:- {a}')

Output

If you run the above program, you will get the following results.

=:- 5
+=:- 6
-=:- 5
*=:- 10
/=:- 5.0
//=:- 2.0
%=:- 2.0

Conclusion

If you have any doubts regarding the tutorial, mention them in the comment section.

raja
Published on 01-Nov-2019 12:38:19
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