Assignment Operators Overloading in C++


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You can overload the assignment operator (=) just as you can other operators and it can be used to create an object just like the copy constructor.

Following example explains how an assignment operator can be overloaded.

Live Demo
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
 
class Distance {
   private:
      int feet;             // 0 to infinite
      int inches;           // 0 to 12
      
   public:
      // required constructors
      Distance() {
         feet = 0;
         inches = 0;
      }
      Distance(int f, int i) {
         feet = f;
         inches = i;
      }
      void operator = (const Distance &D ) { 
         feet = D.feet;
         inches = D.inches;
      }
      
      // method to display distance
      void displayDistance() {
         cout << "F: " << feet <<  " I:" <<  inches << endl;
      }
};

int main() {
   Distance D1(11, 10), D2(5, 11);

   cout << "First Distance : "; 
   D1.displayDistance();
   cout << "Second Distance :"; 
   D2.displayDistance();

   // use assignment operator
   D1 = D2;
   cout << "First Distance :"; 
   D1.displayDistance();

   return 0;
}

When the above code is compiled and executed, it produces the following result −

First Distance : F: 11 I:10
Second Distance :F: 5 I:11
First Distance :F: 5 I:11

cpp_overloading.htm

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