Fraud Detection in Python

PythonServer Side ProgrammingProgramming

Frauds are really in many transactions. We can apply machine learning algorithms to lies the past data and predict the possibility of a transaction being a fraud transaction. In our example we will take credit card transactions, analyse the data, create the features and labels and finally apply one of the ML algorithms to judge the nature of transaction as being fraud or not. Then we will find out the accuracy, precision as well as f-score of the model we are chosen.

Preparing the Data

We in this step we read the source data, study the variables present in it and have a look at some sample data. This will help us in knowing the different columns present in the data set and study their features. We will use Pandas is library to create the data frame which will be used in the subsequent steps.

Example

import pandas as pd
#Load the creditcard.csv using pandas
datainput = pd.read_csv('E:\\creditcard.csv')
#https://www.kaggle.com/mlg-ulb/creditcardfraud
# Print the top 5 records
print(datainput[0:5],"\n")
# Print the complete shape of the dataset
   print("Shape of Complete Data Set")
   print(datainput.shape,"\n")

Output

Running the above code gives us the following result −

    Time       V1            V2          V3     ...         V27          V28    Amount       Class
0    0.0 -1.359807    -0.072781    2.536347     ...    0.133558    -0.021053    149.62           0
1    0.0  1.191857     0.266151    0.166480     ...   -0.008983     0.014724      2.69           0
2    1.0 -1.358354    -1.340163    1.773209     ...   -0.055353    -0.059752    378.66           0
3    1.0 -0.966272    -0.185226    1.792993     ...    0.062723     0.061458    123.50           0
4    2.0 -1.158233     0.877737    1.548718     ...    0.219422     0.215153     69.99           0

[5 rows x 31 columns]
Shape of Complete Data Set
(284807, 31)

Checking the Imbalance in the Data

Now we check how the data is distributed among fraudulent and genuine transactions. This gives us an idea of of what percentage of data is expected to be fraudulent. In ml algorithm this is is referred as data imbalance. If most of the transactions is not fraudulent then it becomes difficult to judge few transactions as genuine or not. We use the class column to count the number of fraudulent engine in transactions and then figure out the actual percentage of fraudulent transactions.

Example

import pandas as pd
#Load the creditcard.csv using pandas
datainput = pd.read_csv('E:\\creditcard.csv')
false = datainput[datainput['Class'] == 1]
true = datainput[datainput['Class'] == 0]
n = len(false)/float(len(true))
print(n)
print('False Detection Cases: {}'.format(len(datainput[datainput['Class'] == 1])))
print('True Detection Cases: {}'.format(len(datainput[datainput['Class'] == 0])),"\n")

Output

Running the above code gives us the following result −

0.0017304750013189597
False Detection Cases: 492
True Detection Cases: 284315

Details of Transaction Types

We investigate further into the nature of the transactions for each category of fraudulent and non-fraudulent transactions. We try to statistically estimate various parameters like mean standard deviation maximum value minimum value and different percentiles. This is achieved by using the described method.

Example

import pandas as pd
#Load the creditcard.csv using pandas
datainput = pd.read_csv('E:\\creditcard.csv')

#Check for imbalance in data
false = datainput[datainput['Class'] == 1]
true = datainput[datainput['Class'] == 0]

#False Detection Cases
print("False Detection Cases")
print("----------------------")
print(false.Amount.describe(),"\n")

#True Detection Cases
print("True Detection Cases")
print("----------------------")
print(true.Amount.describe(),"\n")

Output

Running the above code gives us the following result −

False Detection Cases
----------------------
count    492.000000
mean     122.211321
std      256.683288
min        0.000000
25%        1.000000
50%        9.250000
75%      105.890000
max     2125.870000
Name: Amount, dtype: float64

True Detection Cases
----------------------
count    284315.000000
mean         88.291022
std         250.105092
min           0.000000
25%           5.650000
50%          22.000000
75%          77.050000
max       25691.160000
Name: Amount, dtype: float64

Separating features and Label

Before we implement the ML algorithm, we need to decide on the features and labels. Which basically means the categorizing the dependent variables and the independent ones. In our dataset the class column is dependent on the rest of all other columns. So we create a data frames for the last column as well as another dataframe for rest of all other columns. These dataframes will be used to train the model that we are going to create.

Example

import pandas as pd
#Load the creditcard.csv using pandas
datainput = pd.read_csv('E:\\creditcard.csv')
#separating features(X) and label(y)
# Select all columns except the last for all rows
X = datainput.iloc[:, :-1].values
# Select the last column of all rows
Y = datainput.iloc[:, -1].values

print(X.shape)
print(Y.shape)

Output

Running the above code gives us the following result −

(284807, 30)
(284807,)

Train the Model

Now we split the data set into two parts. One is for training and another is for testing. The test_size parameter is used to decide what percentage of the data set will be used only for testing. This exercise will help us gain the confidence on the model we are creating.

Example

import pandas as pd
from sklearn.model_selection import train_test_split

#Load the creditcard.csv using pandas
datainput = pd.read_csv('E:\\creditcard.csv')

#separating features(X) and label(y)
X = datainput.iloc[:, :-1].values

# Select the last column of all rows
Y = datainput.iloc[:, -1].values

#train_test_split method
X_train, X_test, Y_train, Y_test = train_test_split(X, Y, test_size=0.2)

Applying Decision Tree Classification

There are many different kinds of algorithms available to be applied to this situation. But we choose decision tree as our algorithm for classification. Which is a max tree depth of 4 and supply the test sample to predict the values. Finally, we calculate the accuracy of the result from the test to decide on whether to continue further with this algorithm or not.

Example

import pandas as pd
from sklearn import metrics
from sklearn.model_selection import train_test_split

#Load the creditcard.csv using pandas
datainput = pd.read_csv('E:\\creditcard.csv')

#separating features(X) and label(y)
X = datainput.iloc[:, :-1].values
Y = datainput.iloc[:, -1].values

#train_test_split method
X_train, X_test, Y_train, Y_test = train_test_split(X, Y, test_size=0.2)

#DecisionTreeClassifier
from sklearn.tree import DecisionTreeClassifier
classifier=DecisionTreeClassifier(max_depth=4)
classifier.fit(X_train,Y_train)
predicted=classifier.predict(X_test)
print("\npredicted values :\n",predicted)

#Accuracy
DT = metrics.accuracy_score(Y_test, predicted) * 100
print("\nThe accuracy score using the DecisionTreeClassifier : ",DT)

Output

Running the above code gives us the following result −

predicted values :
[0 0 0 ... 0 0 0]
The accuracy score using the DecisionTreeClassifier : 99.9367999719111

Finding Evaluation Parameters

Once the accuracy level in the above step is acceptable we go on a further evaluation of the model by finding out different parameters. Which use Precision, recall value and F score as our parameters. precision is the fraction of relevant instances among the retrieved instances, while recall is the fraction of the total amount of relevant instances that were actually retrieved. F score provides a single score that balances both the concerns of precision and recall in one number.

Example

import pandas as pd
from sklearn import metrics
from sklearn.model_selection import train_test_split
from sklearn.metrics import precision_score
from sklearn.metrics import recall_score
from sklearn.metrics import f1_score

#Load the creditcard.csv using pandas
datainput = pd.read_csv('E:\\creditcard.csv')
#separating features(X) and label(y)

X = datainput.iloc[:, :-1].values
Y = datainput.iloc[:, -1].values

#train_test_split method
X_train, X_test, Y_train, Y_test = train_test_split(X, Y, test_size=0.2)

#DecisionTreeClassifier
from sklearn.tree import DecisionTreeClassifier
classifier=DecisionTreeClassifier(max_depth=4)
classifier.fit(X_train,Y_train)
predicted=classifier.predict(X_test)
print("\npredicted values :\n",predicted)
#
# #Accuracy
DT = metrics.accuracy_score(Y_test, predicted) * 100
print("\nThe accuracy score using the DecisionTreeClassifier : ",DT)
#
# #Precision
print('precision')
# Precision = TP / (TP + FP) (Where TP = True Positive, TN = True Negative, FP = False Positive, FN = False Negative).
precision = precision_score(Y_test, predicted, pos_label=1)
print(precision_score(Y_test, predicted, pos_label=1))

#Recall
print('recall')
# Recall = TP / (TP + FN)
recall = recall_score(Y_test, predicted, pos_label=1)
print(recall_score(Y_test, predicted, pos_label=1))

#f1-score
print('f-Score')
# F - scores are a statistical method for determining accuracy accounting for both precision and recall.
fscore = f1_score(Y_test, predicted, pos_label=1)
print(f1_score(Y_test, predicted, pos_label=1))

Output

Running the above code gives us the following result −

The accuracy score using the DecisionTreeClassifier : 99.9403110845827
precision
0.810126582278481
recall
0.7710843373493976
f-Score
0.7901234567901234
raja
Published on 04-Feb-2020 10:08:13
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