Difference between Business Continuity and Business Resilience


Many different types of disruptions can seriously impact a business's ability to function normally. As a result of the high-stakes nature of modern life, disruptions may occur with little to no warning. Some may be the consequence of human error and foolishness, while others may be the result of natural disasters like earthquakes, floods, and natural fires.

In times of economic difficulty, some businesses are stronger than others and are able to persevere. The key differentiator between the organizations that are able to continue working regularly during these disruptions is the level of preparation, which includes a business continuity strategy and the resilience of the firm.

What is Business Continuity?

Threats, vulnerabilities, and possible hazards that might disrupt business as usual must be identified, and a framework must be presented outlining contingency plans that are targeted at restoring regular operations in the event of such disasters.

A firm or organization can benefit from a business continuity plan if it is used to avoid a potential disaster. Therefore, it is method-oriented and potentially standardized.

Planning for a company's long-term success requires -

  • Researching the effects on a company's operations, or "business impact analysis," can help pinpoint what information is essential for day-to-day operations.

  • One of the tasks involved in a risk assessment is the identification of potential vulnerabilities.

  • A crucial aspect of risk management is doing what can be done to get rid of or lessen potential threats.

What is Business Resilience?

The term "resilience" is used to describe a group's capacity to adapt to changing conditions and maintain peak performance in the face of threats, both internal and external. When a company has resilience, it can better deal with and respond to security, dangers, preparedness, and survival issues.

The ability of an organization to respond to and recover from any and all threats encompasses both business continuity and crisis management and is known as resilience. The ability to adapt to new circumstances and combine different areas of expertise into one cohesive set of streamlined procedures is also part of this concept. This type of risk management is more strategic. Due to the fact that each business has unique needs, it is tailored to fit each individual organization.

In this day and age, there are a number of potential dangers that might befall a company, including the following -

  • Civil strikes and crises

  • Pandemics

  • Disruptive technological developments

  • A breakdown in the supply chain

  • Economic disruptions

  • Natural catastrophes

  • Terrorism

  • Terrorism and criminal activity online

  • Compliance failures

The following are essential parts of every business's plan for ensuring its resilience -

  • For when business operations are suddenly disrupted, a company must have a plan in place to keep running.

  • Having a plan in place to bounce back from genuine calamities is critical.

  • A plan to protect the company's worth, which in turn protects the shareholders.

  • A company's capacity to recognize and act upon commercial openings that occur from disruptions is greatly enhanced by having an exploitation strategy or plan in place.

Differences: Business Continuity and Business Resilience

Both "business continuity" and "business resilience" include carrying on business as usual in the face of what were formerly considered unthinkable setbacks, however there are some striking differences in these two scenarios, which we have highlighted in the following table −

Characteristics Business Continuity Business Resilience
Definition The term "business continuity" is used to describe the steps taken to ascertain and mitigate the threats, vulnerabilities, and risks that could interrupt regular business operations and put in place a framework that includes contingency plans aimed at getting things back to normal after an interruption has occurred. Business resilience is the ability of a corporation, government, or other organization to adapt to changing conditions and maintain high performance in the face of threats or change from either within or without.
Approach Business continuity is achieved using a process-driven methodology. A more strategic approach to risk management is what makes an organization resilient.
Importance It's in an organization's best interest to keep operations running as usual despite the disruption. Businesses that have developed resilience are better able to deal with issues related to survival, preparedness, dangers, and security.

Conclusion

As their meanings overlap, business resilience and business continuity are often used interchangeably. The term "business continuity" is used to describe the steps taken to ascertain and mitigate the threats, vulnerabilities, and risks that could interrupt regular business operations and to put in place a framework that includes contingency plans aimed at getting things back to normal after an interruption has occurred. It uses a process-driven strategy to redirect a subject away from an undesirable event.

Business resilience, on the other hand, is the capacity of a company, government, or other entity to adapt to changing conditions and maintain optimal operations despite the presence of threats or other disruptions. With this method, businesses may adopt a more strategic approach to managing risks and better respond to and deal with issues of safety, preparedness, and survival.

Updated on: 13-Dec-2022

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