Found 493 Articles for Linux

ARP Commands

Satish Kumar
Updated on 31-Jan-2023 09:20:26
ARP (Address Resolution Protocol) is a networking protocol that is used to map a network address, such as an IP address, to a physical (MAC) address. It is a fundamental building block of the Internet Protocol (IP) and is used to allow devices to communicate with each other on a network. In this article, we will discuss the various ARP commands and their usage, with examples to help you better understand the concept. ARP Command: arp The arp command is used to display or modify the ARP cache on a computer. The ARP cache is a table that stores the ... Read More

Evaluate XPath in the Linux Command Line

Satish Kumar
Updated on 27-Jan-2023 12:53:04
Introduction XPath is a powerful language used for navigating and selecting elements within an XML document. It is commonly used in conjunction with XSLT, a language used for transforming XML documents, to extract specific information from a document. In this article, we will discuss how to evaluate XPath expressions in the Linux command line, using the command-line tool xmllint. Installing xmllint Before we can begin evaluating XPath expressions in the Linux command line, we must first install xmllint. xmllint is part of the libxml2 library, which is included in most Linux distributions. To check if xmllint is already installed on ... Read More

Move All Files Including Hidden Files Into Parent Directory in Linux

Pradeep Jhuriya
Updated on 25-Jan-2023 10:41:57
Introduction In Linux, hidden files, also known as dotfiles, are files whose names begin with a dot (.) character. These files are often used to store configuration data or other important information that should not be changed or deleted by the user. If you have a directory with a large number of hidden files and you want to move them all to the root directory, there are several ways to do this. In this tutorial, we will discuss two methods for moving all files, including hidden files, from a directory to its home directory in Linux: the mv command and ... Read More

Run Cron Job Only If It Isn’t Already Running in Linux

Pradeep Jhuriya
Updated on 25-Jan-2023 10:40:53
Introduction Cron is a utility in Linux that allows users to schedule commands or scripts to run automatically at a specific date and time. However, sometimes it may be necessary to ensure that a cron job does not run more than once at a time. In this article, we will discuss two ways to prevent overlapping cron tasks: using process tracking and using a “.pid” file. Locate running instances by process One way to avoid overlapping a cron task run is to check for the presence of the task's process before running it. This can be done using the pgrep ... Read More

Find the Current Working Directory of a Running Process in Linux

Pradeep Jhuriya
Updated on 25-Jan-2023 10:38:29
Introduction One of the basic tasks when working with processes on a Linux system is determining the current working directory of a process. The current working directory, also known as the "current directory" or "current working folder, " is the directory in which a process runs and interacts with files. Knowing the current working directory of a process can be useful for a variety of purposes, such as debugging, understanding the environment in which a process is running, or simply monitoring the activity of a process. In this article, we will discuss how to find the current working directory of ... Read More

Remove the Last N Lines of a File in Linux

Pradeep Jhuriya
Updated on 25-Jan-2023 10:37:16
Introduction There may be times when you need to remove the last few lines of a file on Linux. For example, you may have a log file that is constantly being added and you want to keep only the most recent entries. In this tutorial, we'll explore a few different methods to remove the last N lines of a file on Linux. Use the head and tail commands The head and tail commands are two very useful utilities for displaying the beginning and end of a file, respectively. By combining these commands, we can easily remove the last N lines ... Read More

Extracting a WAR File in Linux

Pradeep Jhuriya
Updated on 25-Jan-2023 10:33:04
Introduction WAR (Web ARchive) files are a type of archive file used to package web applications into a single file. They are similar to Java ARchive (JAR) files and are typically used to deploy web applications in a Java environment. In this article, we will learn how to extract a WAR file on Linux using the command line. A WAR file is essentially a ZIP file that contains all the files needed for a web application, including HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and Java files. Checking out a WAR file allows you to access the individual files it contains and make changes ... Read More

Displaying Files Side by Side in Linux

Pradeep Jhuriya
Updated on 25-Jan-2023 10:31:53
Introduction Working with files on Linux can often involve comparing or analyzing multiple files at once. A useful way to do this is to view the files side by side in the terminal, allowing for easy comparison and analysis. In this article, we'll explore various ways to view files side-by-side on Linux, including using the diff and sdiff commands, as well as using the text editors vim and emacs. Using the diff command The diff command is a standard Linux utility that compares two files and displays the differences between them. It can be used to view files side by ... Read More

Get the Contents of a Web Page in a Shell Variable on Linux

Pradeep Jhuriya
Updated on 25-Jan-2023 10:29:19
Introduction One of the most useful and powerful features of the Linux command line is the ability to manipulate text. This can be especially useful when working with web pages, as web page content can often be saved as plain text and then manipulated with command-line tools. In this article, we will explore how to insert the content of a web page into a shell variable in Linux. What is a Shell variable? A Shell variable is a value stored in memory and can be used by the shell (command-line interface) and other programs. Shell variables are usually defined in ... Read More

How to Append Contents of Multiple Files Into One File on Linux?

Pradeep Jhuriya
Updated on 25-Jan-2023 10:24:57
Introduction There are many situations where you may need to combine the contents of multiple files into one file. For example, you may have a number of log files that need to be analyzed or you may want to merge multiple text documents into one document for easy editing. On Linux, there are several ways to aggregate the contents of multiple files into a single file, and in this article, we'll explore some of the most popular and effective methods. Method 1: Use the cat command The "cat" command is a powerful tool on Linux that allows you to view ... Read More
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