5 Best Linux Package Managers for Linux Newbies


Linux is a popular open-source operating system that has gained a lot of popularity in recent years. It is known for its flexibility and security, making it a preferred choice for developers and enthusiasts alike. One of essential features of Linux is its package manager, which is a tool that helps users manage software installation, removal, and updates. In this article, we will discuss 5 best Linux package managers for Linux newbies.

What is a Linux Package Manager?

Before we dive into list of package managers, let's understand what a package manager is. In simple terms, a package manager is a tool that helps users install, remove and manage software packages on a Linux system. These packages are pre-compiled software bundles that contain all necessary files and dependencies required to run software.

apt-get

The apt-get package manager is most commonly used package manager on Debian-based Linux distributions, such as Ubuntu and Linux Mint. It is a command-line tool that uses Advanced Package Tool (APT) to manage software packages.

One of advantages of apt-get is its user-friendly interface. It provides users with simple commands to install and update software packages. For example, to install a package, you can simply type "sudo apt-get install package-name" in terminal.

Pacman

Pacman is a package manager used on Arch Linux and its derivatives. It is a command-line tool that is simple and easy to use. Pacman uses Arch User Repository (AUR) to manage software packages, which is a community-driven repository that allows users to create and maintain packages.

Pacman provides users with a lot of options to customize their software packages, making it an ideal choice for advanced users. It also has a simple command structure, making it easy for Linux newbies to use.

Yum

Yum is a package manager used on Red Hat-based Linux distributions, such as CentOS and Fedora. It is a command-line tool that uses Yellowdog Updater, Modified (YUM) to manage software packages.

One of advantages of yum is its dependency resolution system. It automatically resolves dependencies when installing or updating software packages, which can save a lot of time for users. Yum also has a user-friendly interface that makes it easy for Linux newbies to use.

Zypper

Zypper is a package manager used on openSUSE Linux and its derivatives. It is a command-line tool that uses ZYpp package management library to manage software packages.

One of advantages of zypper is its speed. It is known for its fast package installation and update times. Zypper also has a user-friendly interface that makes it easy for Linux newbies to use.

Dnf

DNF is a package manager used on Fedora and its derivatives. It is a command-line tool that uses DNF package management library to manage software packages.

One of advantages of dnf is its speed and efficiency. It is known for its fast package installation and update times. Dnf also has a user-friendly interface that makes it easy for Linux newbies to use.

Graphical Package Managers

In addition to command-line package managers, Linux also has a variety of graphical package managers that provide a more user-friendly interface for managing software packages. These graphical package managers can be helpful for Linux newbies who are not yet comfortable with command line.

Here are some examples of popular graphical package managers −

Ubuntu Software Center

The Ubuntu Software Center is a graphical package manager that is included with Ubuntu and other Debian-based Linux distributions. It provides users with an easy-to-use interface for searching, installing, and managing software packages.

The Ubuntu Software Center also includes user reviews and ratings for software packages, which can be helpful in deciding which packages to install.

GNOME Software

GNOME Software is a graphical package manager that is included with many Linux distributions that use GNOME desktop environment. It provides users with a simple interface for browsing, searching, and installing software packages.

GNOME Software also includes user reviews and ratings for software packages, as well as a feature that recommends packages based on user's previous software installations.

Discover

Discover is a graphical package manager that is included with many Linux distributions that use KDE desktop environment. It provides users with a simple interface for browsing, searching, and installing software packages.

Discover also includes user reviews and ratings for software packages, as well as a feature that recommends packages based on user's previous software installations.

Package Manager Features

When choosing a package manager, there are a few key features to consider. Here are some features to look for −

Dependency Resolution

A good package manager should be able to automatically resolve dependencies when installing or updating software packages. This can save users a lot of time and hassle.

Package Signing

Package signing is a security feature that ensures that packages are not tampered with or altered during installation process. A good package manager should be able to verify package signatures to ensure that software packages are authentic.

User-friendly Interface

A package manager should have a user-friendly interface that makes it easy for Linux newbies to install, remove, and manage software packages. interface should be intuitive and easy to navigate.

Speed

A good package manager should be fast and efficient. Users don't want to spend a lot of time waiting for packages to install or update.

Package Selection

The package manager should have a wide selection of software packages available. This can vary depending on Linux distribution, but a good package manager should have a good selection of commonly used packages.

Package Manager Alternatives

While package managers listed in this article are some of most popular and widely used, there are other package managers available for Linux users. Here are some alternatives −

Snap

Snap is a package manager that is designed to work across different Linux distributions. It uses containerization to ensure that packages are isolated from rest of system, which can improve security.

Snap packages are self-contained, meaning that they include all necessary dependencies required to run software. This can make it easier to install and update software packages.

Flatpak

Flatpak is another package manager that is designed to work across different Linux distributions. It uses containerization to ensure that packages are isolated from rest of system, which can improve security.

Like Snap, Flatpak packages are self-contained, meaning that they include all necessary dependencies required to run software.

AppImage

AppImage is a package format that is designed to be portable across different Linux distributions. It allows users to download and run applications without needing to install them on system.

AppImage packages are self-contained, meaning that they include all necessary dependencies required to run software.

Conclusion

In conclusion, Linux package managers are an essential tool for managing software packages on a Linux system. package managers listed in this article are some of best Linux package managers for Linux newbies. They provide users with simple commands and a user-friendly interface that makes it easy to install, remove, and update software packages. Whether you are using Debian-based, Red Hat-based, or openSUSE-based Linux distributions, you can find a package manager that suits your needs.

Updated on: 10-Apr-2023

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