Difference between Asbestos and Fiberglass

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Fiberglass and asbestos are both fibrous minerals consisting of extremely thin fibers; yet, due to their superior performance in temperature conditions and better tensile strength, fiberglass is regarded as a more secure material than asbestos. When it is placed in the correct manner, it is usually regarded as safe. Fiberglass was initially produced commercially in the 1930s and has since evolved into one of the most adaptable and commonly used materials in contemporary society.

Asbestos is a naturally occurring mineral that is formed of thin fibers, whereas fiberglass is a substance that is manufactured by humans. On the other hand, several nations have outlawed the use of asbestos because of the possible dangers it poses to human health. Nevertheless, it is not illegal to possess or sell in the United States.

What is Asbestos?

Since the dawn of time, people have been aware of asbestos. According to findings from archaeological digs in Finland, there is evidence that asbestos fibers were used in the production of pottery. Although people have been using asbestos as long back as 2500 BC, commercial production of asbestos didn't start until approximately 1850, when Italy began producing paper and fabric. Prior to that, however, asbestos was used in construction.

The production of asbestos goods saw a significant increase with the expansion of asbestos mining in Canada and South Africa, which occurred around the same time as the Industrial Revolution. The term "asbestos" refers to a collection of naturally fibrous minerals that are made up of very fine fibers and has become a generic name for the group.

Chrysotile is the type of asbestos that is utilized the most, and its production accounts for more than 95 percent of the entire worldwide output of natural mineral fibers. Chrysotile is one of six naturally occurring fibrous minerals that make up the majority of this category. It is known to be present in thousands of different manufactured items, including materials used for roofing and insulation in commercial and residential structures alike.

What is Fiberglass?

Asbestos has been largely replaced by fiberglass, a type of fiber-reinforced plastic, notably in the field of heat insulation. Fiberglass was first developed as a substitute for asbestos. The use of fiberglass as a potential replacement for asbestos has been suggested due to the material's superior tolerance to high temperatures compared to that of cotton and other polyester fibers.

For a significant number of years, every category of the racing vehicle has been built with lightweight materials on top of aluminum and steel. These materials included fiberglass. In point of fact, the illustrious Corvette sports car has always been constructed out of fiberglass. However, fiberglass cannot be properly utilized in friction materials such as brake band linings, nor can it be utilized in some highly specialized applications of electrical insulation.

Similar to asbestos, fiberglass is constructed up of long glass threads that are very thin and may be woven together to form a layer. The finest aspect is that fiberglass can be shaped into a wide variety of intricate patterns. Because of this property, fiberglass is a popular material for use in the construction of vehicles, airplanes, boats, storage tanks, bathtubs, pipelines, and roofs.

Differences: Asbestos and Fiberglass

The following table highlights the major differences between Asbestos and Fiberglass −

Asbestos Fiberglass
The term "asbestos" refers to a classification of fibrous minerals that occur naturally. Asbestos has been mostly replaced with fiberglass, which is an artificial fiber-reinforced material.
It is a naturally occurring mineral that is made up of very fine fibers and consists of the mineral. It is a man-made mineral that is composed of long strands of glass that are very thin.
The tensile strength of asbestos is very high. The tensile strength of fiberglass is among the highest of any known material.
In contrast to fiberglass, it does not provide an operating temperature that is stable over time. In comparison to asbestos, it provides a higher continuous operating temperature.
It is more resistant to abrasions and cuts than other materials. It does not have the same level of abrasion resistance as asbestos.
Insulation for thermal systems, surface materials, reinforcing, fireproofing, and other applications all make use of asbestos. Automobiles, airplanes, boats, storage tanks, bathtubs, pipelines, septic tanks, cladding, and roofs are all examples of things that make use of fiberglass.

Conclusion

The term "asbestos" refers to a collection of naturally fibrous minerals that are made up of very fine fibers and has become a generic name for the group. It is believed to be found in hundreds of items manufactured by companies, including materials used for roofing and insulation in commercial and residential structures respectively.

Asbestos has been largely replaced by fiberglass, a type of fiber-reinforced plastic, notably in the field of heat insulation. Fiberglass was first developed as a substitute for asbestos. Fiberglass has a tensile strength that is significantly higher than that of asbestos and can maintain a higher continuous working temperature. In addition to that, it has outstanding performance in thermal settings, which makes it a perfect replacement for asbestos.

raja
Updated on 18-Aug-2022 14:10:15

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