Construct A Terrestrial Food Chain Comprising Four Trophic Levels. (b) What Will Happen If We Kill All the Organisms in One Trophic Level? (c) Calculate The Amount of Energy Available to The Organisms at The Fourth Trophic Level If the Energy Available to The Organisms at The Second Trophic Level Is 2000 J.


Constructing a Terrestrial Food Chain: Understanding the Flow of Energy in Ecosystems

The world is a complex system of interdependent living organisms, each relying on others for survival. Understanding how energy flows through these systems is crucial for the study of ecology and the maintenance of the natural world.

The article below tries to design a terrestrial food chain comprising four trophic levels, examine the consequences of removing organisms from one trophic level, and calculate the energy available to organisms at the fourth trophic level.

What is a Food Chain?

A food chain is a representation of the flow of energy from one organism to another in an ecosystem. It shows how each organism is linked to another through the transfer of energy in the form of food. In a food chain, each level is referred to as a trophic level, and there are typically four trophic levels in a terrestrial food chain.

The Four Trophic Levels in a Terrestrial Food Chain

The first trophic level is made up of producers, which are organisms that create their own food through photosynthesis or chemosynthesis.

This includes plants, algae, and some bacteria. They are the base of the food chain and provide energy to all other organisms in the ecosystem.

The second trophic level is made up of herbivores, which are organisms that feed on producers. This includes animals such as rabbits, deer, and cows.

The third trophic level is made up of carnivores, which are organisms that feed on herbivores. This includes animals such as wolves, lions, and hawks.

The fourth and final trophic level is made up of apex predators, which are organisms at the top of the food chain that have no natural predators. This includes animals such as tigers, sharks, and eagles.

What Happens if We Kill All the Organisms in One Trophic Level?

If we were to remove all organisms from one trophic level, the consequences would be significant. Let's consider an example where all herbivores were removed from a terrestrial food chain.

This would mean that the carnivores at the third trophic level would have no source of food, causing their populations to decline. As a result, the populations of the herbivores at the second trophic level would increase because they are no longer being hunted by the carnivores. This would cause a decline in the populations of the producers at the first trophic level, as the herbivores are now consuming more of their food source. Over time, this could lead to a collapse of the entire ecosystem.

Without the producers, there would be no source of energy for any organism, leading to the extinction of all species within the ecosystem. This is why it is important to understand the interconnectedness of organisms in a food chain and the consequences of disrupting this delicate balance.

Calculating the Amount of Energy Available to the Organisms at the Fourth Trophic Level

To calculate the amount of energy available to organisms at the fourth trophic level, we need to understand the concept of energy transfer in a food chain. As organisms consume other organisms, they only gain a fraction of the energy that was originally available in the food source. This is due to the fact that some energy is lost in the process of digestion, and some is used by the organism for its own metabolic needs.

In general, only about 10% of the energy available in one trophic level is passed on to the next trophic level.

This means that if the energy available to the organisms at the second trophic level is 2000 J, only 200 J of that energy will be available to the organisms at the third trophic level, and only 20 J of that energy will be available to the organisms at the fourth trophic level. This means that if the energy available to the organisms at the second trophic level is 2000 J, then the energy available to the organisms at the fourth trophic level will be only 2 J.

This may seem like a small amount, but it is important to note that apex predators are often the largest and most powerful organisms in an ecosystem. They require a significant amount of energy to maintain their high level of activity and to support their large body size.

Implications for Conservation and Ecosystem Management

Understanding the flow of energy in a food chain is crucial for conservation and ecosystem management efforts. By understanding the interconnectedness of organisms in an ecosystem, we can better predict the consequences of human activities such as habitat destruction and pollution.

For example, the removal of one species from an ecosystem can have ripple effects throughout the food chain. This is known as a trophic cascade. If a predator species is removed from an ecosystem, its prey populations may increase, causing a decline in the populations of the prey's food source. This can ultimately lead to a decline in the populations of the producers at the base of the food chain.

Conservation efforts must therefore take into account the entire ecosystem and the relationships between organisms. This requires a holistic approach to conservation that considers not only individual species, but also the interactions between them.

Conclusion

In this article, we have constructed a terrestrial food chain comprising four trophic levels, examined the consequences of removing organisms from one trophic level, and calculated the energy available to organisms at the fourth trophic level. We have seen how the interconnectedness of organisms in an ecosystem is crucial for understanding the flow of energy and the consequences of disrupting this delicate balance.

Updated on: 04-May-2023

228 Views

Kickstart Your Career

Get certified by completing the course

Get Started
Advertisements