One-to-Many Relationship Model

DatabaseRDBMSComputer Science

In a "class roster" database, a teacher may teach zero or more classes, while a class is taught by one (and only one) teacher. In a "company" database, a manager manages zero or more employees, while an employee is managed by one (and only one) manager. In a "product sales" database, a customer may place many orders; while an order is placed by one particular customer. This kind of relationship is known as one-to-many.

The one-to-many relationship cannot be represented in a single table. For example, in a "class roster" database, we may begin with a table called Teachers, which stores information about teachers (such as name, office, phone, and email). To store the classes taught by each teacher, we could create columns class1, class2, class3, but faces a problem immediately on how many columns to create. On the other hand, if we begin with a table called Classes, which stores information about a class, we could create additional columns to store information about the (one) teacher (such as name, office, phone, and email). However, since a teacher may teach many classes, its data would be duplicated in many rows in table Classes.

To support a one-to-many relationship, we need to design two tables: for e.g. a table Classes to store information about the classes with classID as the primary key; and a table Teachers to store information about teachers with teacherID as the primary key. We can then create the one-to-many relationship by storing the primary key of the table Teacher (i.e., teacherID) (the "one"-end or the parent table) in the table classes (the "many"-end or the child table), as illustrated below.

The column teacherID in the child table Classes is known as the foreign key. A foreign key of a child table is a primary key of a parent table, used to reference the parent table.

raja
Published on 23-Jul-2018 13:40:07
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