Great tools to check linux disk partitions and usage in linux

Information TechnologyLinux

Are you working as a system admin, then you should know these tools to manage disk space. This article explains about how to check Linux Disk Partitions and Usage in Linux.

Fdisk

Fdisk is a text based utility. By utilizing fdisk, you can create a brand new partition, delete the present partition, or exchange existing partition.

To get the more information about fdisk, use the following command –

$ fdisk

The sample out should be like this –

Usage:
fdisk [options] change partition table
fdisk [options] -l [] list partition table(s)

Display or manipulate a disk partition table.

Options:
-b, --sector-size          physical and logical sector size
-B, --protect-boot         don't erase bootbits when create a new label
-c, --compatibility[=]     mode is 'dos' or 'nondos' (default)
-L, --color[=]             colorize output (auto, always or colors are enabled by default
-l, --list                 display partitions end exit
-o, --output               output columns
-t, --type                 recognize specified partition table type only
-u, --units[=]             display units: 'cylinders' or 'sectors' (default)
-s, --getsz                display device size in 512-byte sectors [DEPRECATED]
    --bytes                print SIZE in bytes rather than in human readable format

-C, --cylinders            specify the number of cylinders
-H, --heads                specify the number of heads
-S, --sectors              specify the number of sectors per track

-h, --help               display this help and exit
-V, --version output version information and exit

Available columns (for -o):
   gpt: Device Start End Sectors Size Type Type-UUID Attrs Name UUID
   dos: Device Start End Sectors Cylinders Size Type Id Attrs Boot End-C/H/S Start-C/H/S
   bsd: Slice Start End Sectors Cylinders Size Type Bsize Cpg Fsize
   sgi: Device Start End Sectors Cylinders Size Type Id Attrs
   sun: Device Start End Sectors Cylinders Size Type Id Flags

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To get the list of devices, use the following command –

$ sudo fdisk -l

The sample output should be like this –

Disk /dev/ram0: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes

Disk /dev/ram1: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes

Disk /dev/ram2: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes

sfdisk

sfdisk is a script-based tool to display or manipulate a disk partition table.

To get more information about sfdisk, use the following command –

$ man sfdisk

The sample output should be like this –

SFDISK(8) System Administration SFDISK(8)

NAME
   sfdisk - display or manipulate a disk partition table

SYNOPSIS
   sfdisk [options] device [-N partition-number]

   sfdisk [options] command

DESCRIPTION
   sfdisk is a script-oriented tool for partitioning any block device.

   Since version 2.26 sfdisk supports MBR (DOS), GPT, SUN and SGI disk labels, but no longer provides any       tionality for CHS (Cylinder-Head-Sector) addressing. CHS has never been important for Linux, and this      
addressing concept does not make any sense for new devices.

   sfdisk (since version 2.26) aligns the start and end of partitions to block-device I/O limits when     relative
   sizes are specified, or when the default values are used.

   sfdisk does not create the standard system partitions for SGI and SUN disk labels like fdisk(8) does. It necessary to explicitly create all partitions including whole-disk system partitions.

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To get the list of devices, use the following command –

$ sfdisk -l

The sample output should be like this –

Disk /dev/ram0: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes

Disk /dev/ram1: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes

Disk /dev/ram2: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes

lsblk

lsblk gives information about all or particular block devices. To get the more information about lsblk, use the following command –

$ man lsblk

The sample output should be like this –

LSBLK(8) System Administration LSBLK(8)

NAME
   lsblk - list block devices

SYNOPSIS
   lsblk [options] [device...]

DESCRIPTION
   lsblk lists information about all available or the specified block devices. The lsblk command reads the     sysfs filesystem and
   udev db to gather information.

   The command prints all block devices (except RAM disks) in a tree-like format by default. Use lsblk --help    to get a list of all
   available columns.

   The default output, as well as the default output from options like --fs and --topology, is subject to       change. So whenever pos‐sible, you should avoid using default outputs in your scripts. Always explicitly       define expected columns by using --output col‐umns-list in environments where a stable output is    required.

   Note that lsblk might be executed in time when udev does not have all information about recently added or    modified devices yet.
   In this case it is recommended to use udevadm settle before lsblk to synchronize with udev.
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To get the list of devices, use the following command –

$ lsblk

The sample output should be like this –

NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT
sda 8:0 0 465.8G 0 disk
├─sda1 8:1 0 462.3G 0 part /
├─sda2 8:2 0 1K 0 part
└─sda5 8:5 0 3.4G 0 part [SWAP]
sr0 11:0 1 1024M 0 rom

lsscsi

It provides information about a list of SCSI devices (or hosts) currently attached to the system.To get the more information about lsscsi, use the following command –

$ man lsscsi

The sample output should be like this –

NAME
lsscsi - list SCSI devices (or hosts) and their attributes

SYNOPSIS
   lsscsi [--classic] [--device] [--generic] [--help] [--hosts] [--kname] [--list] [--lunhex] [--long] [--      protection] [--protmode]
   [--scsi_id] [--size] [--sysfsroot=PATH] [--transport] [--verbose] [--version] [--wwn] [H:C:T:L]

DESCRIPTION
   Uses information in sysfs (Linux kernel series 2.6 and later) to list SCSI devices (or hosts) currently       attached to the system.Options can be used to control the amount and form of information provided for       each device.
   If a H:C:T:L argument is given then it acts as a filter and only devices that match it are listed. The       colons don't have to be
   present, and '-', '*', '?' or missing arguments at the end are interpreted as wildcards. The default is       '*:*:*:*' which means to
   match everything. Any filter string using '*' of '?' should be surrounded by single or double quotes to       stop shell expansions.
   If '-' is used as a wildcard then the whole filter argument should be prefixed by '-- ' to tell this       utility there are no more
   options on the command line to be interpreted. A leading '[' and trailing ']' are permitted (e.g.    '[1:0:0]' matches all LUNs on
  1:0:0). May also be used to filter --hosts in which case only the H is active and may be either a number or    in the form
 "host" where is a host number.
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To get the list of SCSI devices (or hosts) currently attached, use the following command –

$ lsscsi

The sample output should be like this –

[0:0:0:0] disk ATA WDC WD5000LPVX-7 1A01 /dev/sda
[1:0:0:0] cd/dvd TSSTcorp DVD+-RW SU-208FB D200 /dev/sr0

In this post, we have learned some very useful tools – “To check Linux Disk Partitions and Usage in Linux”. In our next articles, we will come up with more Linux based tricks and tips. Keep reading!

raja
Published on 22-Oct-2019 16:08:12
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