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EJB 3.0 Persistence out of a J2EE container

In this article we will learn how to manage the persistence issues without being tied to use a J2EE application server.
http://www.censnet.it/articles/cap03.htm
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Description:

In this article we will learn how to manage the persistence issues without being tied to use a J2EE application server.
We will build a very basic sample application that saves and loads data on a database using an EJB 3.0 persistence implementation.

At present (April 2007) there exist two implementations of the EJB 3.0 persistence specification: the first is Hibernate-based and was adopted by JBoss, while the other is Oracle Toplink, included into the Oracle Application Server OC4J and into the EJB 3.0 Sun Reference Implementation also known as Glassfish Project .
Note that EJB 3.0 persistence specifications are only a part of the EJB 3.0 specifications. They do not deal with Session Beans (stateless or stateful), but only with the Entity Beans.

Well, the good news is that, as long as we need only the EJB 3.0 persistence layer and do not need Session Beans, we can use Hibernate or Toplink implementation (our choice!) just into any Java application, without the need of a J2EE container, not even a web server, just from a plain Java class!

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