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Absloute path vs relative path in LinuxUnix

One of this blog follower asked us that
http://www.linuxnix.com/2012/07/abslute-path-vs-relative-path-in-linuxunix.html

Description:

What is an absolute path?
An absolute path is defined as the specifying the location of a file or directory from the root directory(/). In other words we can say absolute path is a complete path from start of actual filesystem from / directory.

Some examples of absolute path:


/var/ftp/pub
/etc/samba.smb.conf
/boot/grub/grub.conf


If you see all these paths started from / directory which is a root directory for every Linux/Unix machines.

What is the relative path?
Relative path is defined as path related to the present working directory(pwd). Suppose I am located in /var/log and I want to change directory to /var/log/kernel. I can use relative path concept to change directory to kernel

changing directory to /var/log/kernel by using relative path concept.

pwd
/var/log
cd kernel
Note: If you observe there is no / before kernel which indicates it's a relative directory to present working directory.

Changing directory to /var/log/kernel using absolute path concept.


cd /var/log/kernel
Note: We can use an absolute path from any location where as if you want to use relative path we should be present in a directory where we are going to specify relative to that present working directory.

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