PL/SQL - FOR LOOP Statement


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A FOR LOOP is a repetition control structure that allows you to efficiently write a loop that needs to execute a specific number of times.

Syntax

FOR counter IN initial_value .. final_value LOOP 
   sequence_of_statements; 
END LOOP;

Following is the flow of control in a For Loop

  • The initial step is executed first, and only once. This step allows you to declare and initialize any loop control variables.

  • Next, the condition, i.e., initial_value .. final_value is evaluated. If it is TRUE, the body of the loop is executed. If it is FALSE, the body of the loop does not execute and the flow of control jumps to the next statement just after the for loop.

  • After the body of the for loop executes, the value of the counter variable is increased or decreased.

  • The condition is now evaluated again. If it is TRUE, the loop executes and the process repeats itself (body of loop, then increment step, and then again condition). After the condition becomes FALSE, the FOR-LOOP terminates.

Following are some special characteristics of PL/SQL for loop −

  • The initial_value and final_value of the loop variable or counter can be literals, variables, or expressions but must evaluate to numbers. Otherwise, PL/SQL raises the predefined exception VALUE_ERROR.

  • The initial_value need not be 1; however, the loop counter increment (or decrement) must be 1.

  • PL/SQL allows the determination of the loop range dynamically at run time.

Example

DECLARE 
   a number(2); 
BEGIN 
   FOR a in 10 .. 20 LOOP 
      dbms_output.put_line('value of a: ' || a); 
  END LOOP; 
END; 
/

When the above code is executed at the SQL prompt, it produces the following result −

value of a: 10 
value of a: 11 
value of a: 12 
value of a: 13 
value of a: 14 
value of a: 15 
value of a: 16 
value of a: 17 
value of a: 18 
value of a: 19 
value of a: 20  

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed. 

Reverse FOR LOOP Statement

By default, iteration proceeds from the initial value to the final value, generally upward from the lower bound to the higher bound. You can reverse this order by using the REVERSE keyword. In such case, iteration proceeds the other way. After each iteration, the loop counter is decremented.

However, you must write the range bounds in ascending (not descending) order. The following program illustrates this −

DECLARE 
   a number(2) ; 
BEGIN 
   FOR a IN REVERSE 10 .. 20 LOOP 
      dbms_output.put_line('value of a: ' || a); 
   END LOOP; 
END; 
/

When the above code is executed at the SQL prompt, it produces the following result −

value of a: 20 
value of a: 19 
value of a: 18 
value of a: 17 
value of a: 16 
value of a: 15 
value of a: 14 
value of a: 13 
value of a: 12 
value of a: 11 
value of a: 10  

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed. 

plsql_loops.htm

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